Historic Preservation

Redmond Historic Core

Old Town Historic Core Plan Underway In 2014

We want your perspective regarding Old Town's historic core in Redmond's Downtown.  The historic core includes the area from the Justice White house at Leary Way and NE 76th to NE 80th Street and from the Stone House to 164th Avenue NE.

Several people provided input during June and July's engagement events.  Now we'd like your ideas and perspective to finalize the preferences for several aspects of the Historic Core.  This campaign will let you add your ideas and comment on staff's questions and other community ideas.

Historic Core Online Conversation with IdeaScaleAdd Ideas & Perspective to the
Online Conversation

Then, during this autumn, the final community event will be to debrief and confirm aspects for the Historic Core plan based on findings and feedback we received from the community and from property and business owners throughout the plan's development.  Because we will partner with Homegrown Deli, the new sandwich shop that is currently making their tenant improvements to the Brad Best Realty Building (Old Redmond State Bank at Leary Way and Cleveland Street), the date of this event has not been scheduled.  Please stay tuned for additional information very soon.


Historic Core Moonshine 2014

4Culture Site SpecificMOONSHINE
in the Historic Core
September 24, October 1, & October 8

It is Redmond's turn to celebrate local stories of the 1914 prohibition.

Bill Brown's Saloon 1915 before statewide prohibitionHistoryLink.org provides:

"State Prohibition Law, 1914 - 

On November 3, 1914, after prodigious Anti-Saloon League lobbying efforts statewide, Washington voters approved Initiative Measure Number Three, prohibiting the manufacture and sale (although not the consumption) of liquor statewide. Washington women had gained the right to vote in 1910, and their votes contributed to the passage of the initiative. Washington's 1914 prohibition law was statutory, not a constitutional amendment. The popular vote was 189,840 for, 171,208 against. Initiative Number Three exposed a marked split between Washington's urban and rural voters. Even though the initiative failed in Seattle, Tacoma, and Spokane, it won statewide. City people opposed it whereas smalltown and rural people were in favor.

Any saloons that had weathered Local Option closed as of midnight on December 31, 1915. The only legal drinking from this point was via imported liquor that had been manufactured out of state -- the law allowed individuals with permits to import up to two quarts of hard liquor or 12 quarts of beer every 20 days. Among those without permits (or those who lacked the means to prepay and ship alcohol), illegal drinking surged, largely via illegal sales at soft drink stands and restaurants. Drug stores, where prescription liquor could be obtained, boomed. A 1985 master's thesis comparing the effects of Prohibition on various West Coast cities states that 65 new drug stores opened in Seattle between January and March, 1916."

Though we are not resurrecting the backyard still, we plan to celebrate this historic time period in our Historic Core. 

Celebrate though art, dance, drama, and poetry the local stories and people of this time period on September 24, October 1, and October 8. 

From 6:00pm to 8:00pm, travel from one business to another while experiencing and taking part in this 4Culture and City of Redmond Site Specific event series.
 

Also look for Moonshine specials throughout the Historic Core.

More at http://www.sitespecificarts.org/project/redmond-moonshine-tours/ and by contacting Kimberly Dietz, Redmond's Historic Preservation Officer, 425-556-2415.

Planning the Future of History -
In Redmond's Old Town Historic Core

The Old Town Historic Core Plan addresses the Core's long-term character, strategies for enhancing economic vitality, and a variety of ways for supporting business and property owners within the Historic Core.  Community input will inform development of an integrated plan approach in the context of other Downtown projects, such as Cleveland Streetscape and the Redmond Central Connector; streetscape standards; complementary design standards; guidance for art; and marketing and event planning in the Historic Core.

To learn more about this process and the Historic Core, contact:  Kimberly Dietz, 425-556-2415 with questions.

Old Town


Redmond Receives Award for Success in Historic Restoration at the 12th Annual John D. Spellman Awards

 

2012 Spellman AwardMayor Marchione, members of the Redmond Rotary, City officials, and staff accepted an award from King County Executive Dow Constantine on May 24, 2012 for restoration of the Anderson Park picnic shelter.  A grant from the Redmond Rotary and the City's Heritage Restoration and Preservation Grant program helped the restoration project take place. 






Anderson Picnic Shelter 2011 RestorationDetailed efforts in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Preservation, Rehabilitation, Restoration and Reconstruction Projects restored this structure using techniques that represent those of the shelter's original construction.  By matching wood type and ring-count and by using hand tools to work the wood, the contractor created an authentic representation of Redmond history while helping to support park visitors today and in the future.

Additional information:

Adaptive Reuse in Old Town (Redmond's Downtown)

 

Continuing the National Preservation Month celebration, regional experts in historic preservation, adaptive reuse, and sustainable architecture presented to property owners of historic properties on May 14, 2011. 

 

Program Overview

The City of Redmond established a Historic Preservation program in 2000.
The program includes:

Nationally Recognized

In 2006, the City was nationally recognized as a Preserve America Community by then-First Lady, Laura Bush. The "Preserve America" initiative was a White House and now a National Parks Service program to encourage and support community efforts to preserve America's cultural and natural heritage. Preserve America initiatives include: a greater shared knowledge about the nation's past; strengthened regional identities and local pride; increased local participation for preservation of the country's cultural and natural heritage; and support for economic vitality of American communities.

Related Resources

For more information on the program:

Contact: Kimberly Dietz - 425-556-2415